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"He's Scottish, he's made from the same cloth as Sir Alex and he's the kind of guy you look at and think 'stability'."

- Peter Schmeichel

09/05/2013 16:05
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Cut from the same cloth

David Moyes has been at Everton's helm since March 2002, during which time he’s proved a big hit with the blue half of Merseyside.

So, what do Manchester United fans need to know about the man who’s been charged with leading the Reds into life after Sir Alex Ferguson? Here's our quick guide to the new gaffer...

Shared roots
Like Sir Alex, David Moyes hails from working-class Glasgow. Both men also turned out for Dunfermline Athletic in their playing days (albeit 23 years apart) and, between them, represented Rangers (Sir Alex) and Celtic (Moyes).

Playing career
David Moyes pulled on seven clubs’ shirts during his 19-year playing career as a centre-back.  And while he never scaled particularly lofty heights nor earned international recognition, he made more than 550 appearances both north and south of the border.

Student of the game
Moyes reportedly began taking his coaching badges when he was just 22 and kept detailed notes of the techniques and tactics employed by his managers. That probably helps explain his early move into coaching, as a player-manager at Preston North End (then Division Two), aged 35.

Pedigree with Preston
When he first took the reins at PNE, in January 1998, the Lancashire club were in danger of dropping down to the fourth tier of English football. Barely two years later, Moyes guided North End to the 1999/2000 Division Two title, clear of regional rivals Burnley by seven points.  The following season, with almost the same squad, Moyes’ Preston came within a whisker of promotion to the Premier League.

Loyal and experienced
Moyes has been at Everton for more than 11 years, making him the third-longest serving manager in the Premier League after Sir Alex and Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger. As Sir Alex once said admiringly, “David has had to contend with not having a strong financial structure. He has had to get the best out of the players he has had available and he has done an amazing job.” The average length of service for a Premier League manager is less than four seasons.

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