Patrice Evra coaching Man Utd youngsters earlier this season

Evra: I start from zero as a coach

Patrice Evra says he'll have to start from 'zero' as a coach and isn't setting his sights on any particular team when it comes to taking his first steps in management.

The legendary left-back announced his retirement from professional football in July 2019 and has spent the time since studying for his UEFA A and B licences, alongside old rival, ex-Chelsea defender Ashley Cole.

The COVID-19 pandemic has put a temporary halt to Evra’s learning, and the 38-year-old admitted he’s not looking too far ahead in terms of any one particular management role.

“I want to manage, it doesn't matter [where],” Evra told us on UTD Podcast.

Video
WATCH: A 20-minute snippet from Evra's honest and enlightening podcast episode.

“I don't put any goals. In my life, I never put any goals because, when you put some goals and you don't reach them, what's the first thing [that happens]? You get disappointed. So I don't put any goals.

“I'm living in the present. I'm not living in the future because, if you live in the future, you will live with anxiety. And if you live with the past, you will live with regret. So I'm just living in the present.

“To say which team I want to coach, I don't know. I will take what the universe gives to me.”

Evra is the latest in a long line of Sir Alex Ferguson’s former charges to focus on making it as a manager.

The former France international experienced a stellar eight years at Old Trafford, claiming 10 pieces of major silverware between 2006 and 2014.

Evra also captained Les Bleus at the 2010 World Cup and started in the Euro 2016 final, which France lost to Portugal on home soil.

However, Patrice is keen to draw a line between his glittering playing career and his new life as a coach and feels the need to prove himself to people all over again.

United Greats: We all love Patrice Evra Video

“I love working with kids, and you exchange some different ideas, and it's such a different role, being a manager,” Patrice added.

“Some players, they think because you have the biggest career, then you're going to be a top manager. But no, you're back to zero.

“As a player, of course, you win this, but as a manager - what have they done? Nothing.

“So I start from the beginning, from zero, and that's why I spend many hours with kids and doing my stuff. But it's so nice and I enjoy it because, like I say, if you want to become a great manager, you need to start from zero and forget the player you were.

“I remember some inspectors they were like: 'Oh Patrice, we try to be nice because you are [a famous player]'. I'm like, 'Eh, I'm nobody - treat me the same way you're treating the other players'.”

As many other players do post-retirement, Evra has also written a book, which should hit the market soon.

Patrice has promised more funny tales, as well as some hard-hitting stories about his childhood, although fans of ‘drama’ will be disappointed.

“I hope this book will be in schools, to motivate kids in their dreams, to believe that, no matter what, you can achieve many things. It's more like a motivational book. It's not like any drama.

“Sometimes people make books and they talk bad about this person. If I need to talk bad about one person, I'll do it during my time when I was playing. Not now, when it's over. I'm not that kind of person.

“It's just telling you the stuff I tell you. Motivate people, crazy stories. If you read it you're going to cry more, so don't read it!

“It's some tough, tough parts of my childhood, some stuff I've never said. It's going to be a great book.”

Find more great tales from the UTD Podcast series here.

More from Evra's Podcast: